Archive for March, 2014

Washington Hall in the News

Poster design by Redfyve.com

Poster design by Redfyve.com

It’s not too late to buy tickets and join Historic Seattle for a not-to-be-missed benefit concert featuring performances by four generations of the legendary Holden Family, a dynasty of Seattle jazz and music, and special guests The Teaching featuring Evan Flory Barnes, Josh Rawlings, and Jeremy Jones. Proceeds will go to restoring this 106-year-old historic building to its former glory and re-activating it as a vibrant community gathering place for arts and culture.

The event is this Saturday, March 29, 2014 (7:30 to 10:00 pm) at Washington Hall.

The event and our restoration efforts at Washington Hall have been in the news lately. Check out these articles and great piece on KPLU!

Jerry Large’s March 27th column in the Seattle Times, “Benefit party to help pay for the restoring Washington Hall.” 

KPLU-FM story about Washington Hall and the Holden family, descendents of Seattle jazz patriarch Oscar Holden. Be sure to listen to the great interview! 

City Living Seattle recently highlighted our upcoming benefit concert for Washington Hall in this article, “Behind the Curtain, Benefit Concert.” 

Louisa Hotel Update: After the Fire

View of the north and west facades of the historic Louisa Building in the Chinatown-International District. A Christmas Eve 2013 fire burned the western half of the building.

View of the north and west facades of the historic Louisa Building in the Chinatown-International District. A Christmas Eve 2013 fire burned the western half of the building.

MAin2 has been following the Louisa Hotel’s status after the western half of the building burned in a fire on December 24, 2013. This historic Chinatown-International District building, built in 1909, housed some of the neighborhood’s longest operating businesses including Mon Hei Bakery and Sea Garden Restaurant. All businesses have remained closed since the fire.

Here’s a Louisa Building FAQ from the property owner.

The Seattle Weekly’s current issue (March 19-25, 2014) features a an excellent cover story on the building and the neighborhood.

Here’s a building update from the City of Seattle (sent to community members on March 7, 2014):

We write to you today to provide an update on the status of the fire-damaged Louisa Hotel building located at 669 South King Street.  There has been some information in the news as of late, which we wanted to clarify.  As of March 5, the Department of Planning and Development (DPD) and the Seattle Department of Neighborhoods (DON) began reviewing a permit application to stabilize the existing building to remove safety concerns for neighboring tenants and the public.  The proposal requires removal of the west wall on Maynard Alley, which was most severely damaged by the fire.  The remaining portions of the building will be braced and stabilized until future renovations can occur.  There are no plans to demolish the entire building at this time.

Both the City and the property owners are motivated to act quickly and preserve as much of the existing building as possible.  A permit will be issued shortly, which could allow work to begin by late-March.  Once the building is fully stabilized, it will allow private engineers to further evaluate the structure and help us determine the appropriate next steps regarding future redevelopment.  Attached is a fact sheet prepared by the owners of the building which provides answers to common questions and contact information for the community.

If you have questions about the status of the permit, please feel free to contact Bryan Stevens of the Department of Planning and Development. He can be reached at bryan.stevens@seattle.gov or 206-684-5045.

Musical Benefit for Washington Hall – March 29, 2014

Poster design by Redfyve.com

Poster design by Redfyve.com

Buy tickets today!

Join Historic Seattle for a not-to-be-missed benefit concert featuring performances by four generations of the legendary Holden Family, a dynasty of Seattle jazz and music, and special guests The Teaching featuring Evan Flory Barnes, Josh Rawlings, and Jeremy Jones. Proceeds will go to restoring this 106-year-old historic building to its former glory and re-activating it as a vibrant community gathering place for arts and culture.

With a new roof, seismic stabilization of the south wall, refinished floors, and funds to build an elevator secured, we’ve entered the final phase of the campaign. We need to raise $2.2 million by June 2014 to continue the renovation. In addition to fully restoring the Main Hall and Lodge Room to their original condition, the full rehabilitation of Washington Hall will include renovating the former Danish settlement house in the western third of the building. Once home to immigrants of all backgrounds, these spaces will become offices for Hidmo, 206 Zulu, Voices Rising and other community organizations, classrooms and meeting rooms, a recording studio, and cafe.

Please visit the Washington Hall website or contact Historic Seattle to donate to the campaign and to learn more about the history of Washington Hall. Purchase tickets here!

We need event volunteers! If interested, please contact Van Diep, Washington Hall Rental Manager at vand@historicseattle.org.

The Greenest Building – Seattle Screening, March 13

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What: The Greenest Building: Documentary Screening and Discussion

When: Thursday, March 13, 2014, 6 – 8 pm

Where: Seattle Central Library Auditorium, 1000 4th Ave, Seattle, WA 98014

Registration: Free/donation

Over the next 20 years, Americans will demolish one third of our existing building stock (over 82 billion square feet) in order to replace seemingly inefficient buildings with energy efficient “green” structures. Is demolition in the name of sustainability really the best use of natural, social, and economic resources? Or, like the urban renewal programs of the 1960s, is this well-intentioned planning with devastating environmental and cultural consequences?

Attend a free showing of The Greenest Building, an hour-long documentary produced by filmmaker Jane Turville. The film presents a compelling overview of the important role building reuse plays in creating sustainable communities, and explores the myth that a “green building” is a new building and demonstrates how renovation and adaptive reuse of existing structures fully achieves the sustainability movement’s “triple bottom line.” The film reveals: (a) how reuse and reinvestment in the existing built environment leads to stronger local economies that can compete on a global scale, (b) that sense of place and collective memory, while intangible, are critical components of strong sustainable communities, and (c) the direct correlation between reuse of existing buildings and a significant reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, degradation of the natural environment and overuse of precious natural resources.

If you’re interested in buildings, community development, sustainable communities or just plain want to find out if existing buildings really are worth keeping, plan to attend this special event. Turville will introduce the film and moderate a discussion by a panel of experts, including Chris Moore, Executive Director, Washington Trust for Historic Preservation; Michael Malone, Principal, Hunters Capital; and Mark Huppert, Senior Director, Preservation Green Lab at National Trust for Historic Preservation. The event is organized by Historic Seattle and is co-sponsored by the Seattle Public Library, Hunters Capital, RAFN, Preservation Green Lab, ULI Northwest, Washington Trust for Historic Preservation, AIA Seattle, and Seattle Architecture Foundation. To register, go to www.historicseattle.org.


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The writers who post entries on MAin2 represent various views and opinions. The blog posts do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of Historic Seattle.